Pressure Point Shoulder Massage - Relaxing ASMR

2018-06-20 1,605 82 192,809 YouTube

If you are looking for professional counseling that’s affordable and convenient, please check out my sponsor BetterHelp! https://www.influencerlink.org/SHS They're an amazing way to get therapy online for stress, anxiety, depression, and more. Click here to check them out! https://www.influencerlink.org/SHS Thank you for watching! Please subscribe and stay-tuned for more Massage ASMR videos! For more video please go to my channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/camasmr Say Hi to me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rak.valentino Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/iem.sophirak Support me? I humbly accept at: Paypal: iemsopherak@gmail.com https://www.patreon.com/camasmr Spending days hunched over a computer, behind a driving wheel, or simply sitting with a bad posture, puts a lot of pressure in the neck and shoulder, resulting in stiff shoulders, lack of flexibility in the neck and headaches. The massage will work from your upper back up to the top of your head. Head, shoulder and back massages soothe away tensions in your upper body, break down knots and improve your flexibility. It helps relieve headaches by stimulating the nerves on your scalp and the blood circulation within your head. You will feel relaxed and re-energized. Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is a euphoric experience characterized by a static-like or tingling sensation on the skin that typically begins on the scalp and moves down the back of the neck and upper spine, precipitating relaxation. It has been compared with auditory-tactile synesthesia. Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) signifies the subjective experience of 'low-grade euphoria' characterized by 'a combination of positive feelings, relaxation, and a distinct static-like tingling sensation on the skin'. It typically begins 'on the scalp' before moving 'down the spine' to the base of the neck, sometimes spreading 'to the back, arms and legs as intensity increases', most commonly triggered by specific acoustic, visual and digital media stimuli, and less commonly by intentional control.